Friday, October 24, 2014

Sh*t $how

So sorry to have cut off the "We care" slogan, I show my "caring" differently
“How long have we been doing this for?” my friend Keri asked as we rolled our wheelie suitcases toward each other in the Atlanta airport. “A long time” I said but really it’s been at least 10 years we been going to nutrition conferences together. We need continuing ed. credits to maintain our RD (Registered Dietitian) degree and hey- we always manage to have a great time.
We flew in Sunday as our friend Ashley Koff was hosting a dinner at a sustainable seafood restaurant in town for fellow RDs.  The dinner started with us going around the room to introduce ourselves (always embarrassing when you have corresponded with people for years online and do not know their face from their twitter handles). We were also asked to say something we were grateful for. When it was my turn I said something about traveling with close friends but as I thought about it later I had a different answer. I am truly grateful to do what I do. I love nutrition, love counseling clients and writing, trying new foods and really the whole gamut. If you’re read my posts before I generally don’t gush a whole lot so this means something. It will also make you understand why what I’ll write about in a bit upset me so.
Dinner at Goin’ Coastal was innovative and interesting. As the chef, Seth Hendricks, introduced the courses he discussed where he purchased his fish and the importance of things like “day boat fish” as sometimes even freshly caught has been on a boat for weeks. We had hummus with hemp seeds and dolmades made with broccoleaf. Someone from EWG explained the upcoming food scores the group is releasing this month. This app will enable consumers to scan products to find out about ingredients and additives.
The following day was FNCE (The Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo). These are allegedly items dieticians should suggest to their clients or patients.
Here’s what we found when we walked into the expo hall


A little anecdote, I went up to the rep at the marshmallow pie booth and asked "how are these healthy?" She looked puzzled and said "um like what do you mean?" So, I said well it's a NUTRITION expo." I was truly horrified. I didn't go around trying to find unhealthy foods this is just a taste of what was there. I could count the truly upstanding brands on one hand. Where are the standards? How is this corruption (because that’s what it feels like) allowed? How are all these RDs paying dues and admission to an organization that thinks Tony the Tiger cares?  As far as the public, no wonder people are taking advice from health coaches and fitness professionals- would you take advice from an organization that supported marshmallow pie?
I’d love to hear from RDs, I’d love you to comment if you are as fed up with this as I am. I’d love (pipedream perhaps) to go to FNCE next year and see that soda is no longer part of a healthy diet according to the governing body of dietetics and nutrition. And if you’re not an RD what message is this sending you? 

69 comments:

  1. WOW. You don't need to be a RD to get a handle on that conference. The photos speak volumes. Keep swimming against that tide!

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  2. Thanks Liz, truth be told my husband said "don't post about this" I had to. No, you don't have to be an RD and I'd encourage anyone to contact the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) and speak your mind. I do call on my colleagues to swim with me against the soda and GMO-filled "tide".

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  3. So interesting and disheartening, Lauren. Thanks for sharing all that info.

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  4. Great post Lauren, totally agree with you. A picture says a thousand words.

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  5. Honestly, when I decided that I wanted to pursue a career in nutrition, this is the reason that I decided not to go the RD route, and instead to focus simply on teaching busy parents how to cook real food. I follow the Walnut Board on FB, for example, and they had a whole photo montage of participants from the conference. My take-away? Whoa. Overall, that is not a healthy looking bunch. It's really sad that this is the professional face-- and powerhouse-- for "healthy" eating.

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  6. The vast majority of RDs I've come across on the internet via blogs and twitter have so much real and relevant knowledge to share. How unfortunate that a professional conference would allow these vendors. Keep doing what you're doing!

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  7. Laurie Avenell OlsonOctober 24, 2014 at 7:11 AM

    I'm not an RD and I am a mom and when I found out about GMOs nearly 5 years ago now, I realized that the AMA and the nurses and RD were as clueless as I had been. The "alternative medicine people" seem to be more open to the news about Glyphosate and what it is doing to us, if they don't know about it they are learning as fast as they can. Anyone who has Monsanto at their conferences is off my list of people to listen to about anything. Look up the book, "My City Was Gone", and that is just the tip of the iceberg.

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  8. Laurie Avenell OlsonOctober 24, 2014 at 7:17 AM

    Thank you. This takes guts. I appreciate you speaking out about this and posting about it. I'm glad to know there are Rds out there with integrity.

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  9. Parents like me are working hard to raise healthy kids and need the AND on our side instead of being used by the junk food companies. Thank you for speaking up!

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  10. Laurie Avenell OlsonOctober 24, 2014 at 7:27 AM

    You should see the photos of the WA state Grange at their last conference. These are the people growing our food. It is blatantly obvious we are not thriving on GMO junk sprayed with chemicals.

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  11. I am not an RD. To me this says if you care about your health DO NOT under any circumstances take the advise of an RD. Excluding you of course. Sad state of affairs.

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  12. This makes me unbelievably angry!! This is big part of why I'm not an RD. I value integrity over selling my soul any day. (Not you, Lauren, but the the industry as a whole.) Monsanto-a chemical company- at a "nutrition" conference? Absolutely appalling.


    Thank you for writing this and I hope that RDs will pay attention and start being part of the solution instead of the problem.

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  13. I AM a MS, RD. Please know that there is a VERY large group of us who speak out against AND and the garbage they promote due to sponsorship. The truth is, most of us have a mind of our own and do not buy into that garbage. We sat for and passed a national exam, we went to school for years to learn about nutrition and food and counseling and more. We are also trained in the science of digestion, absorption and utilization of nutrients, as well as the needs of those in different disease states - this is something other nutritionist/health coaches have not done. If you are seeking nutrition advice, just do your research and choose the RD that is in lube with your beliefs. It's the same thing you do when choosing a physician for your family or childcare for children.

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  14. This is exactly why we need truth in labeling! I had to chuckle at the woman standing in front of the sugar industry booth, case in point. It's a shame that this industry has sold out to food manufacturers. I do applaud those that have gone beyond conventional training to learn the truth. I encountered this problem head on when my 5 year old grand daughter came home from school with her list of "approved snacks" to bring to school. The only things that were healthy were the veggies the rest included goldfish, Cheezits, gogurt yogurt, cheese sticks etc. Everything was GMO's and a laundry list of chemicals. I am a health coach and a graduate of the Institute for Integrative Nutrition. We learned about foods, real foods and how they can heal. We weren't funded by or taught by any of the major food manufacturers. My grand daughters school is also one of the 80% of schools across the country that has a contract with Coca Cola. Seriously, they sent home items for the kids to bring to a movie night and every beverage was coke, pepsi or one of their products, no 100% fruit juice, but they did ask for water. Needless to say, I had my grand daughter at my home for a sleepover to avoid the onslaught of junk. It's maddening and we as a society are just digging ourselves into a healthcare nightmare everyday. Until we get real, this is not going to change. People need to understand that no food manufacturers are looking out for your best interest. It is all about selling more food and $$$$!

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  15. Thanks Ella, I'm still happy I went the RD route and had time in the hospital really learning about disease states and medications so I am comfortable counseling all clients. However, this is sad. And it is a "powerhouse" as you say just wish power used in to a better end. And Walnut Board funny you should mention. I was there and asked if a salad they were providing samples for had gluten. The rep said "walnuts don't have gluten" and I asked about the dressing she started flipping through a recipe book. Not good at all.

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  16. Did not see/know of are you saying it was similar to FNCE or whole foods/inspiring? Need some inspiration after all of this. Ha.

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  17. Thank you Dr Pragati. Yes, so many RD with pure intentions and good information but the organization has a lot of clout or should I say could be a positive force if not for this. I am just looking for some channels for change. So I'm starting with a blog post.

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  18. Disheartening for sure and food for everyone nutrition professionals and every professional. Where is our info coming from and who can we trust?

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  19. And these are just a few pictures...oy.

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  20. "used by the junk food companies" so true but if you allow yourself to be bought or used...right?

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  21. Thank you for excluding me BUT the irony of FNCE was that the night before I was in a restaurant full of well-meaning, passionate and honest RDs so it's not just me it's a lot of us under a governing body that one should really not take advice from right now.

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  22. Thanks for commenting Sarah and kudos to you for spreading the truth always. Funny you should mention RDs, clearly as I said in another reply there are a lot of good RDs BUT we cannot ignore what is happening. That's just as bad as promoting it. I know many RDs will not share this post out of fear. What- fear of AND? I am no longer a member and truthfully I am considering whether I need to maintain my RD status via conferences like this.

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  23. Kylee, I hear you and I have valued my RD status for a long time. However, I have to politely disagree that consumers should just seek out the right RD for themselves. That's not enough. We need to share photos from FNCE we need to get some sort of petition to AND, we need to not pay dues to an organization that doesn't show us they value their member's health and integrity etc.

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  24. I agree with a lot of what you've said. I don't necessarily think INN is the answer unfortunately. Yes, learning about real foods is key BUT to counsel clients with health issues you need to know about disease states, medications people may be taking and to have some first hand knowledge of what diabetes, dialysis and cancer look like. So I value my RD degree for that but not what this professional organization is promoting.

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  25. What frustrates me the most is that any RD who brings this topic up is immediately branded as "negative" and "against our profession." Thank you for being brave enough to post about this.

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  26. I was there as a rep for Bakery on Main. We demoed Certified Gluten Free & Project Non GMO Verified oatmeal & granola. I was appalled at some of the vendors there which seemed hypocritical & oxymoronic at a Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo. I feel good representing all our products.

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  27. I'm replying as an RD. I completely agree with 99% of what you are saying. We don't want our profession to appear to be bought out by big brands. I'm a proponent of real food, of non-GMO and organic foods. From the photos you took, I wouldn't council my clients to eat any of this stuff! I attended FNCE in Houston, and was saddened by some of the brands I saw represented, and some of the ignorance of reps there - just like you.


    But haven't you ever found yourself getting excited about something you never saw coming - like a client that had a fried chicken sandwich from Chick-Fil-A? Because it was only once this week, instead of every day.


    Where does the ideal meet reality? What about lower income individuals, or people who are starting from a diet that is 100% fast food? Can we celebrate the strides that major national brands are taking to improve some of their products? is there room for people to improve their diets one-step at a time? Can we value the healthier alternatives of Tropicana and Quaker without valuing the whole of Pepsi?


    I can make a good argument for not even letting these "marginal" products and brands in the door. But I can also make an argument for making sure we know what the "lesser of the evils" options are. What options are most of the country choosing between at the grocery store or convenience store? And remembering that people are human, and might throw out the baby with the bathwater, if our advice seems too extreme relative to where they are now. I wonder what larger conversations exist out there.


    (I think we can agree that marshmallow pies don't have a place, no matter what criteria you use!).

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  28. I am in school now and it is the one thing that bothers the heck out of me! It just continually shows us that money talks and that these big corporations. I did the IIN program because of this but I don't have the clinical and scientific background to do the work and research I want. If RDs that give a sh*t stick together we can continue to build our stance on the cr@p people think is "healthy". With or without the money... While I do not know about the CEC process I think fieldtoplate.com have like-minded CEC programs for RDs.

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  29. Not an RD: what this means to me is that the consumer is on their own, in other words Caveat Emptor (buyer beware!) Money and corrpution are rampant. Phoney concern and shallow attempts from the same corporations who block GMO labeling, trading lawyers with the FDA so the good ole boy system is firmly cemented in our now toxic food chain. Disgusting and shameful. Our country has decayed into an immoral money grubbing rich boys amusement park at the consumers expense.

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  30. Before jumping on the anti-GMO bandwagon, did any of y'all stop to think that maybe it's the processed crap made from these ingredients and not the commodities or production practices at the farm level that is causing the problem? My horses have eaten GMO feed since 1996 and they are as healthy and fertile as they ever were.

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  31. Katie- thanks for your thoughtful comments. I am by no means elitist or unrealistic in my hopes for FNCE and AND (not saying you said so). I know that steps in the right direction need to be applauded. However, how about saying to these big food companies that they cannot display products unless they meet certain criteria? While I help clients take steps in the right direction I mince no words with artificial sweeteners, soda, processed soy etc. I have a line I will not cross. I understand AND's line may be different but can we agree there should be a line? We stand for ______ and that blank shouldn't be "companies with big checkbooks".

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  32. And you can sleep at night Eddy. Did your company express your feelings to AND? I wonder how they would take it if healthy vendors spoke up. Hypocritical and oxymoronic- high five (and moronic too).

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  33. Oh I get that constantly Alysa but you no what? Going to the monsanto booth is way worse. I don't think it's brave, I think it's our duty. And I have faith enough RDs think and feel the way we do, will they do anything? Interestingly saw a lot of RDs favoriting my tweets, why not retweet and spread the word, hmn?

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  34. Cultured foods, you're talking my language (see Skinny Gut post), only Siggi's for probiotic anything but a decent lecture on micro biome and obesity. I will look up the book and I wish I could tell you Monsanto was ostracized, nope. Booth full of people.

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  35. Curious how you measure health...

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  36. Love field to plate/Amanda. I have faith there are likeminded RDs. I do not claim to know what others are doing to rectify this OR if there's any sort of petition in the words. I hear you about IIN (mentioned that in another comment) but yes RDs will have no credibility if this continues (if they do now).

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  37. Hi. I'm an RD and hate our sponsors. At the last California dietetics Assoc meeting McDonald's provided lunch- I was appalled!

    Check out Dietitians for Professional Integrity. I am not affiliated with the group, but I follow them on Facebook. Info from their website: "a group of concerned dietetics professionals looking to advance the dietetic profession and credential through advocating for greater financial transparency and ethical sponsorships within the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

    This website was created to let you know more about who we are and why we do not think Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, Kellogg's, and other Big Food giants should sponsor the country's largest nutrition organization."

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  38. Becky Vander SluisOctober 25, 2014 at 7:01 AM

    Thank you so much for posting this. I am a student and I went to FNCE for the first time this year and was greatly discouraged to see everyone who I look at as role models buying into the system. People were 'Happy' having sugary sports bars and the line for the Coca cola pop machine was longer than any other line. I agree with you that the organization that we pay money to should step up and not allow these companies to be represented at FNCE.

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  39. Thank you so much for posting this. I stopped being a member of AND about 3 years ago after learning about their corporate sponsorships. Never mind the cost of membership being so high! It's no wonder people are seeking out non RDs for nutrition counseling. Even CMS who recently approved dietitians to become privileged by hospitals to order diets wrote "nutrition professionals" in their ruling. Instead of restricting it to just RDs. Some states are even changing their licensing laws to also allow non RDs to become licensed to practice. This profession can be so frustrating and then to see the pictures of what products are being promoted at this conference are appalling. I'm also happy I went the RD route but will continue to not renew my membership to AND. I will definitely be writing a letter to them after seeing this. Thank you again for this eye opening post!

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  40. Thank you so much for posting this. I agree. It's all about the money instead of what is really good for our profession and clients. A couple years ago I went to the California Dietetic Association meeting which was sponsored by McDonald's. I was appalled. Keep paving the way!!

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  41. Thank you so much for this post. I am an RD and feel exactly the same. Did you see the ATKINS BOOK booth? Absolutely nuts and infuriating.

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  42. Becky- thanks for your comments. Let FNCE know- send them this link or write to them. OK, will you?

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  43. High five, write a letter. I had to write this post but I know this isn't enough (I'm sure I'm already on their bad list ha). I am not a member (and then have to pay more for FNCE which is frustrating). I enjoy seeing colleagues, I enjoy some of the presentations (though they could sway from some topics they stick to year after year) but this expo says it all, it really does.

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  44. Didn't see the Atkins booth- Atkins has survived Dr Atkins, who knew?

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  45. Seems from the response there are a lot. Why does this take guts? I have a career I'm passionate about, a company I'm grateful for and I feel would be worse to say nothing. I'm not criticizing what you said but why are we all so fearful. As Alysa said- for our colleagues to call us negative? I am find with that if I'm being negative about frosted flakes at our national conference.

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  46. McDonalds, I mean my children can tell you why that's unhealthy.

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  47. Becky Vander SluisOctober 25, 2014 at 6:30 PM

    Will do what I can, thanks!

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  48. I'm an RD in community nutrition. I teach people how to cook and eat healthy on a very type budget, often times a budget supported mainly by SNAP funds. I've learned that you have to get on someone's level before expecting them to make all of the healthy switches. So we teach them, hey if oyu're going to buy poptarts, buy them with the whole grain stamp. No, it's not a good choice. Would I rather they have a better breakfast? Of course. But I've learned how overwhelming nutrition and cooking is to people and especially those in my community and I need to take them one step at a time towards better choices. I don't like that FNCE or any nutrition conference has these types of supports/ads basically going around...but America eats what they're showing you. Personally, I'm better off educating people how to make less of the bad choices and more of the good ones. Slowly, good habits build and we're able to make headway towards a healthier future with them. I got off topic but I am hopeful that one day we're not using these big supporters as our means of funds. However, MORE dietitians need to SPEAK UP. I am way more disgruntled when I meet a dietitian who'd rather hide at her office than speak up and get noticed. Phew :) good discussion though!

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  49. thanks for a great post! it is sad...was the new oh so healthy green coca-cola there, too? people are confused, they get sicker even following what they believe (are told!) is a healthy lifestyle to then pop a pill produced by companies that obviously care so much about their health. hopefully, one by one, those that see through this will be able to change this status quo!

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  50. I am not an RD but as a person who tries to live a healthy lifestyle and encourage people around me to do the same, this really irks me. I'm not surprised though. These big corporations know that money and influence can get them what they want, and the average American consumer can be easily convinced that their products - full of sugar, salt, and in some cases, flammable chemicals - can be part of a healthy diet. It's sickening. In more ways than one! That's why we need people like you, Lauren, and those who read your blog (like Eila) to get the word out and educate people on how to live long and healthy lives by eating well!


    Also, it really bothers me when I see ads for that Oscar Meyer "protein" pack in Runners World. It's basically a lunchable for adults - and we all know how healthy those are.

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  51. Sadly I have spoken to RD students who are afraid to speak up because they have been told it could affect their internship placement and job prospects.

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  52. Maybe it takes guts because of the shaming and passive-aggressive attacks that take place. I'm probably too thin-skinned.

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  53. Stacia Kristof Khalidwe NordinOctober 28, 2014 at 2:21 AM

    I'm an RD of 23 years looking at this from outside the US borders and am deeply saddened that our Association lets me down when it comes to relationships. There are hundreds, if not thousands, or companies that we could be partnering with to demonstrate to the public what a healthy food systems looks like and what a healthy balanced diet looks like. Americans get plenty of help from companies on the horrid food systems (horrid for people, societies, economies, fairness and environmentally).

    Our job should be showing the best.

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  54. Thank you for sharing your perspective on the conference and on our professional society, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. While I appreciate diversity in our profession and recognize there are multiple points of view possible, I do not share the same view as you on the conference. I am an RD and I've worked in various facets of food and nutrition, including owning a restaurant in Kentucky with my mom; clinical nutrition and clinical management; food management; writer; entrepreneur; private practice; academics; and now public affairs for an agricultural company. As you can see from my journey, there are many, many ways to practice food and nutrition, and to me, this is akin to the many possible differences that exist in dietary patterns. I consider myself a social scientist as well as an RD. From my work with patients I've come to understand that cultural identity is a powerful indicator of how people eat, and I've also accepted that there are a wide variety of dietary patterns and components of a healthful diet. Not all diets can or should fit one definition of health. Some dietary components should be eaten frequently; others less frequently. The images you show in this blog contain some foods or beverages that would be recommended as "less frequently," like ice cream. But I don't think anyone would deny the pleasure and joy in a scoop of ice cream ... with blueberries and walnuts on top. There were several other vendors present with nuts, dried fruit, yogurt, grains, foodservice equipment, computer software, and much more. The conference comprises a lot more diversity than you represented in your blog, and I hope readers will talk to others who attended to gain additional perspective.

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  55. Lauren - I work for Monsanto. Did you have a bad experience at our booth?

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  56. Milton thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts. Most nutrition professionals have an array of experiences to draw on and appreciate that clients, patients and consumers have various "dietary patterns". Our job is to steer those we come in contact with in more wholesome directions. Why would "less frequent" foods as you describe them be at our profession's largest product expo? There are many definitions of healthy but most RDs would be able to place ice cream, fast food, sugary cereals and marshmallow pies in the unhealthy category, c'mon. I did not go out of my way to find unhealthy products, the truth is I could've posted dozens more. I would be hard-pressed to find a dozen items at that huge expo I would want my children, parents or clients eating. And for the record, Blue Bunny didn't have blueberries and walnuts on top nor did the marshmallow pies have a side of kale.

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  57. I'm a little late to the conversation, but thanks (as usual) for speaking your mind and getting the conversation started Lauren! I'm also happy to read the comments, both for and against your post, and see that we can be respectful of others opinions and keep the conversation civilized, as I think that's the first step to making a change in the right direction. Although I wasn't at FNCE, I absolutely agree that there are certain products that shouldn't be on display at a Food and Nutrition Conference. I'm not sure what the best solution is, but, after reading your post, I will be writing a letter to AND expressing my own personal desire for change and to establish a criteria for food products that can be on display at FNCE. I hope others will continue to chime in and move this very important conversation forward.

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  58. nice article....

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  59. I agree with Lauren here Katie. Steps is critical for many
    Clients and going from fast food 5 days a week to 1 time is a step for some people. Anyone would applaud that as progress. However, I think Lauren is saying that at a conference for our field there is no need for this to be where out support coming from.

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  60. I do think you are a brave person Lauren! But, agree you are simply speaking your mind and you do so well. Because we want change in our exact field (RD vs other health professionals) is not negative. It is positive. We don't have to choose sides. RD or some other health prof not supported by AND. It should be the norm that RD's (with the background education in science) should be supportive of the things you have mentioned... Organic, non-gmo etc. It should not be one or other. And the AND should come around to that. Thank you for pushing that forward.

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  61. So I guess my original post was deleted so I will try again. Lauren, I'm a bit surprised at the title of your blog which seems unnecessarily negative and demeans the work of the hundreds of dietitians, chefs and other individuals who try and put on this event for some 8,000 nutrition professionals and students. It is a Food and Nutrition Conference AND Expo. The Educational component which seeks to present informational sessions and then the other component, the Expo which is to showcase products to registered dietitians and nutrition professionals who work in a variety of areas from schools and the community to clinical, culinary, private practice, fitness and academia. Taking a few select photos does little to capture the hundreds of booths at the Expo Hall. Fresh California strawberries, a new variety of lettuce, portion plates, innovative ways of baking with avocado, new books and apps....at the Monsanto booth I spent time talking to the two lovely women farmers who told me about their farms...
    I agree that sponsorship can be a tricky issue ...personally I would have concerns about attending a dinner sponsored by the Environmental Working Group and Sharecare.com - Dr Oz's website - particularly since Dr Oz was called out by our elected officials for promoting quack based cures.

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  62. Thank you for writing a comment that expresses what you have to say without being nasty. I'm not demeaning hard work but I'd sure be outraged if I spent my time working at an event that promoted products I posted about. Again, I could post 20 more, the junk was everywhere. If you're at a medical convention and there's a cocaine booth (a drug that's clearly unhealthy) you are going to talk about that versus the statins. So a booth of strawberries doesn't make any of this right.

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  63. Leah I do agree that there are thousands of professionals who put on this conference and expo and many of them I am confident that Lauren would stand behind. I do not feel she was demeaning to any of them, she was simply pointing out the unhealthy side of the event that she saw and it was not to take away from the healthy parts that have may have been there too (clearly noted in her response below). Lauren does a lot to support fellow professionals including RDs.

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  64. You wouldn't find an illegal drug at a medical convention. Again, my point was that dietitians work in a variety of settings. Not all are entrepreneurs or work in clinical settings. Some do work in food service, the culinary world, schools, supermarkets. What I need to learn about may not be what you need or want to learn about.
    I also want to make sure that those reading this who don't go to FNCE understand: 1. FNCE is not a mandatory event. 2. the educational sessions are separate and most all are NOT industry sponsored; 3. the expo hall is a voluntary exhibit - no one forces you to go or to visit any of the booths. 4. we are intelligent/educated people and seeing a display whether at an Expo or in a supermarket doesn't mean we will eat/buy or believe it whether it's kale chips or candy.

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  65. So let's see...I remember seeing Wild Blueberries, Almonds, Walnuts, Avocado, Strawberries, Chobani Yogurt, Bob's Red Mill oatmeal, Bakery on Main oatmeal, milk, cheese, a new kind of lettuce, barley, wild caught tuna, dried plums - that's 14 off the top of my head. oh, and Daisy Sour Cream, Eggs, Wheat Council, Oldways http://s19.a2zinc.net/Clients/Academy/FNCE2014/public/eventmap.aspx?ID=1745&thumbnail=1&sortMenu=105000

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  66. Laurie Avenell OlsonDecember 12, 2014 at 10:12 AM

    I don't know why people would not speak up. I'm sure they have their reasons. I'm happy when anyone steps out from the crowd and calls a spade a spade. In my experience many people just don't want to bother with it. (I don't understand them, but there it is.)

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  67. Laurie Avenell OlsonDecember 15, 2014 at 3:15 PM

    There is a big difference between photos of people growing Organic foods and photos of farmers who are going the conventional and/or GMO route. It is the same thing when you go into the grocery store and shop in the organic section or go into the center of the store where there are the processed foods laced with Glyphosate and GMOs. We should all be opting out of the North American feeding studies going on these past 20 years.

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